Thursday, March 26, 2009

Locavore Support Online

It's time for a Thursday lifestyle blog.

As a vegan and locavore, I buy local vegetables, grow my own, and store/preserve foods for the winter months.

Finding fresh, organic vegetables for me includes buying shares in Community Supported Agriculture, in my case from Red Fire Farm.

I also enjoy farmer's markets and local specialty producers of heirloom beans, tofu, and grains.

All of this required a great deal of research and experimentation.

Now there's an App for that!

On the iPhone Store, Locavore is an iPhone/iPod application that tells you when local fresh produce is available and where to find it.

The app is a great resource who anyone who wants to optimize the produce of each season, find it locally, and prepare it using advice from Epicurious or Wikipedia. You can search by your current GPS location, by state, by fruit/vegetable name, and by farmer's market.

Asparagus and Rhubarb are coming into season soon.

10 local farmer's markets within 10 miles of my home have iPhone accessible web links.

For $2.99 I found Locavore a useful application to keep me aligned with bounty of each season.

3 comments:

m said...

did you link the app in your blog post? if so I can't find it. I think there is a way to insert links which then pop up itunes app on your computer and take you directly to the app in the itunes store. ty

Labandibar said...

It's better to be a vegan than a locavore, according to March 18th Boston Globe article.

"When the Oxford Dictionary named 'locavore' the word of the year, I couldn't really believe it," Weber said. It spurred him to do a study of the carbon impact of eating an all-local diet.

He found that people could commit to eating all-local to shrink their carbon footprint, but they could accomplish the same thing more simply by replacing less than a day's worth of calories from red meat and dairy in their diet with chicken, fish, eggs, or fruits and vegetables each week. Cows, because of everything from the amount of feed they require to the methane gas they release during digestion, have large carbon footprints.

Football Matches said...

He found that people could commit to eating all-local to shrink their carbon footprint, but they could accomplish the same thing more simply by replacing less than a day's worth of calories from red meat and dairy in their diet with chicken, fish, eggs, or fruits and vegetables each week.

Recep Deniz MD

DoktorTR.Net