Sunday, August 6, 2017

Unity Farm and Sanctuary Guest Post

Over the past few weeks I've been writing a few journal articles and finishing a book, so my blog posts have waned.    They will start again soon.   In the meantime, my mother is visiting and here is her guest post.


Dagmar Halamka's farm notes from August 4,2017 and August 5, 2017.

The beauty here is infinite - wildflowers everywhere, bee colonies in colorful hives, gushing fountains in ponds with swimming ducks and geese and vast amounts of greenery because of the frequent rain.  60 acres of enchanted forest  that even "House and Garden" magazine could not duplicate surround the farm.  Roosters begin crowing about 4:30am. A very slow moving freight train provides a marvelous whistle several times a day as it moves through the countryside.

Today was Blueberry picking day at Unity Farm.  It’s hard work!  An hour and a half of picking rendered one bucket (I ate a "few"). I am renegotiating my contract!

Palmer, the turkey, followed us around all day - wherever we went. He extends his plumage often so we can admire how grand he is. When I returned with the blueberries, ALL the geese greeted me with extensive honks (males) and hinks (females). I think they believed I had food for them.

Then planting time arrived - I planted 45 lettuce seeds. Really easy since John had already provided the soil blocks.

We streamed "Lion" yesterday evening. I highly recommend it. A beautiful story with an
endearing plot theme.

We visited the new "age restricted" (over 55) condominiums at Abbey Road - just 500 yards from Unity Farm on the trails through the sanctuary. I was immediately surprised by the Revolutionary W War era cemetery in the front of the development.

Tuesday, the local Garden club will come to Unity Farm for a potluck. Kathy admitted they will
market living in Sherborn to me.

Who knew that a machine existed to wash eggs - with an alkaline egg wash solution? The next step is to brush each one with a toothbrush and finally float them in a sink of water to determine if they sink or not (don’t eat the ones that float). We washed 10 dozen eggs.

I decided to walk to the post office (and to treat myself to ice cream at the C and L Frosty).   I was sauntering back when a torrential rainstorm appeared, seemingly out of nowhere. Kathy drove down in the car and truly rescued me.

Dinner with John’s daughter was at a Japanese restaurant in Wellesley. They lived
there before moving to Sherborn. So it has sentimental memories for her. She loves her job at "Game Stop"- especially interacting with all the customers.

More tomorrow.

Thursday, July 6, 2017

Reflections on the US HIT Policy Trajectory

I’m in China this week, meeting with government, academia, and industry leaders in Guangzhou, Shenzhen,  Beijing, Shanghai,  and Suzhou.    The twelve hour time difference means that I can work a day in China, followed by a day in Boston.    For the next 7 days, I’ll truly be living on both sides of the planet.

I recently delivered this policy update about the key developments in healthcare IT policy and sentiment over the past 90 days.

I’ve not written a specific summary of the recently released Quality Patient Program proposed rule which provides the detailed regulatory guidance for implementation of MACRA/MIPS, but here’s the excellent 26 page synopsis created by CMS which provides an overview of the 1058 page rule.

In general, it has many positive provisions.

The industry is welcoming the delays and accommodations it includes, especially the use of 2014 certified records for the 2018 year and the small practice exemptions which recognize the technologies/people/processed needed to succeed under MACRA/MIPS could overwhelm independent clinicians.

The Senate replacement for the Affordable Care Act continues to be debated and there is concern that loss of medicaid dollars may eliminate funding streams that supported healthcare IT.   It’s too early to tell where the ACA repeal/replace activity will converge.

What can we say about the IT policy direction of the US right now?

1. There seems to be great consensus that all stakeholders need to focus on enhancing interoperability technology and policy in support of care coordination, population health, precision medicine, patient/family engagement, and research.  

2.  There is also a consensus that usability of the IT tools in the marketplace needs to be enhanced.   Although the major EHR vendors are working on usability improvements, I believe the greatest agility will come from startup community via apps that get/put data with EHRs using APIs based on evolving FHIR standards.    Here’s my sense of each vendor’s approach

Epic - will support open source FHIR APIs at no cost for the use cases prioritized by the Argonaut working group and HL7.  Will also support proprietary Epic APIs for Epic licensees.

Cerner - similar to Epic with additional SMART on FHIR support

Meditech - will support open source FHIR APIs and give encourage developers to work with customers to leverage the SQL-based Meditech data repository at each customer site.

Athena - will support open source FHIR APIs at no cost but give much more sophisticated workflow integration through the more disruption please program, which involves revenue sharing with developers.

eCW - the department of justice settle should lead to additional eCW support for standards based data exchange.  

3.  Many organizations in industry, government, and academic are thinking about patient identity strategies.  It’s too early to know what solutions will predominate but leading contenders are biometrics (fingerprint, image recognition, palm vein geometry etc.), a voluntary national identifier issued by some authority (public or private sector), or some creative software solution such as OAuth/OpenID/Blockchain etc.  In July, I will co-chair a national consensus conference on patient identifiers hosted by the Pew Charitable Trust.   I’m hoping we achieve consensus on a framework that accelerates the availability of such an identifier for multiple purposes.

4.  Several groups are thinking about how best to converge our heterogenous state privacy policies, specifically focusing on  the role of the patient as data steward.   We can radically simplify privacy protection if the patient is the agent by which information is shared.

5.  Finally, there seems to be an overwhelming sentiment that the concept of certification  and prescriptive IT policy should be replaced by an outcomes focus.    Rather than counting the number of Direct messages sent, giving organizations the flexibility to each data using the the most locally appropriate technology but then holding them accountable for a result of that data exchange i.e. reduced readmissions, reduced redundant testing, reduced errors seems to be well aligned with a move to value-based purchasing.

In theory the members of the new Healthcare Information Technology Advisory Standards Committee (which replaces the former Policy and Standards Committees)  will be named in July.    I look forward to hearing about the initial challenges the group will tackle.   I’m hopeful they will choose some of the issues mentioned above.

In several recent lectures, I’ve reinforced my optimism for the future of the healthcare IT ecosystem.   I believe the next few years will be filled with market driven innovation, encouraged by new consumer demand for healthcare process automation and supplemented by low cost, cloud based utility devices such as the machine learning and image recognition APIs offered by Google and Amazon.    It will be a great time for entrepreneurs, providers, and patients, all of whom are fatigued after years of Meaningful Use, ICD10, and accelerating  numbers of quality measures.   As a CIO, I’m looking forward to doing what my customers want me to do instead of being told what I must do.

Sunday, July 2, 2017

Building Unity Farm Sanctuary - First Week of July 2017

Admittedly, the pace of my writing has slowed this Summer since each day is filled with a combination of IT work, mentoring, and keeping 60 acres of farm/sanctuary running smoothly.    How’s it all going?  Our trajectory is good.

So much of what we’re doing  at the farm/sanctuary is improvisation that we have no choice but to create a vision and accept ambiguity on the daily journey.

We received a request to adopt a house pig - Rue, who’s 80 pounds at 4 years old and extremely well behaved.  We’ve been socializing her with the other pigs and thus far, all is proceeding as expected - they challenge each other across a fence and eventually accept their place in the social hierarchy.    Now that we have 5 pigs, the question we asked is what is their ideal living arrangement - how can we create a pig “condo complex” that works in summer and winter for everyone.  


Sometimes a sense of urgency is needed to motivate change.    We have 8 baby turkeys and they needed a safe outdoor home.    Although we built an aviary last year, Penny, the Yorkshire pig, was living in the aviary at night because she was not ready to spend the night with Tofu and Lunchbox, the pot belly pigs.    Although we knew it would cause one night of anxiety, we put all of them together in a paddock and gave Penny a separate crate so that she could have a private space.    After a few nights, she began sleeping with the other pigs and now all of them cluster in a single pig pile, completely happy together.   The empty aviary became the home for the baby turkeys.

We put Rue and Hazel together in a paddock separated by fence.    At this point they are rubbing noses and not fighting.  After another month, we’ll take down the fence.  

The new arrangement - 3 pigs living in one paddock and 2 pigs living in another - completely supports our daily routines and workflow.   The farm is a continuous experiment and this time it all worked.

Similarly, it’s clear that our 5 horses will have a natural grouping - the dominant Arabian (Amber) and the assertive Welsh Pony (Sweetie) will get along perfectly.    The older Welsh Pony (Pippin), the shy Welsh Pony (Grace), and the good natured Welsh Pony (Millie) will be a perfect herd.  

Our new paddocks and run ins are progressing well.   The horse groups above will occupy two paddocks, we’ll leave one paddock open for exercising/running, and leave a paddock for whatever flexibility we need to continue our sanctuary mission.

The last experimental animal grouping that is working very well is the combination of goats and a donkey.    Star the donkey is doing well on her diet/exercise program and after a year, she’ll have a healthy weight.   The goats can eat her food but she cannot eat the goats food.     They keep each other company and are very happy.

If you asked me a few years ago if we would be the stewards of horses, donkeys, pigs, llamas, alpacas, geese, ducks, chickens, guinea fowl turkeys, Great Pyrenees and bees, I would have questioned your sanity.     Now every creature is part of the daily fabric of our lives and we treasure all of them.

The Sanctuary volunteer program is in full gear with multiple people donating time to the sanctuary every day.    They are grooming horses, walking the donkey, feeding poultry, cleaning paddocks, and socializing with the pigs.   The sanctuary has become such a community destination that there is not a moment of private time left on the property - and we’re ok with that.    My advice to our family - always stay dressed!

A mother rabbit had a litter of 4 babies in the middle of the orchard.   I did not realize that rabbits create hidden burrows in grasslands so that their young are just under the surface.    While walking through the orchard I heard a squeak and picked up the baby pictured below - I returned her immediately to her mother and the family in the rabbit den.


It’s early Summer harvest time and we’ve picked a few hundred heads of lettuce, 4 beds of basil, strawberries, cucumbers, and peas.   Garlic, tomatoes, and peppers are next in line.

Will I ever have time to continue the volume of writing I once did?  As building the sanctuary and nursing the animals back to health is replaced with maintaining the sanctuary and helping the animals thrive, there is a certain routine that will return to each day.    Waking up a dawn, feeding/watering, walking, cleaning, and medications takes about 2 hours.   Then comes, the work day.  Evening chores to prepare everyone for a safe and quiet night takes about 2 hours.    It’s common for Kathy and I to sit down for the first time each day at 9pm.   As I reflect on this stage of life - 33 years of marriage, 20 years as a CIO, and a married daughter living in her own household - having the joyful chaos of the farm and sanctuary 7x24x365 is exactly right.

Thursday, June 8, 2017

Building Unity Farm Sanctuary - Second Week of June 2017

Star the Donkey arrived at the Sanctuary last week and she’s living with the goats, serving as a livestock guardian.    She’s 18 years old  (donkeys live to 35) is about 100 pounds overweight.   We’ll be restricting her diet, giving her daily exercise, and provide intensive veterinary care until her weight normalizes.    I expect that will take a year or two.    Her first vet visit and farrier (hoof) work will be this week.


Honey the chicken develop wheezing this week and we’ve isolated her from the flock.   Although she has intermittent breathing issues, she’s eating, laying eggs, and acting normally.     We’re not sure if its viral, bacterial, parasitic, or structural, but we’ll continue to isolate and observe her.

Dr. Henry Feldman from BIDMC brought us an unusual gift this week - a laser cut holder for Unity Farm Cider and Honey Lager.   He made it on his Glowforge, a 3D laser printer.    The precision is amazing.   Here’s a video showing how it works.


Work on the sanctuary continues.   This week we replaced the toilets with modern low volume models from Toto so now we have highly reliable bathrooms for guests, visitors, and events.   We’re continuing work on the water system and all plumbing from well head to house distribution should be replaced by next week.

It’s been raining non-stop for the past week and we’ve been doing our best to keep the animals warm and dry.    Palmer the Turkey has learned to sleep indoors on rainy nights but most of all he loves his humans.



As the mud dries we’ll continue to add stone dust to the new paddocks and build fences.   By July we should be ready for the four new 12x20 run ins.

This weekend I’ll continue our Spring program of trail mowing and maintenance.   At this point, that means nearly 3 miles of work as listed below.     At the end of mowing 3 miles of trail, Ibuprofen is your best friend.


On the Unity Farm property, 6000 feet
Woodland trail 950 feet
Barn road 250 feet
Mushroom trail 250 feet
Orchard road 350 feet
Old Cart path 600 feet
Marsh trail 850 feet
Unity Lane 500 feet
Driveway 500 feet
Orchard trail 800 feet
Gate trail 450 feet
Forget me not glen  200 feet
Cattail hollow 50 feet
Momiji Matsu trail 250 feet

On the Sanctuary property,  2640 feet
Pine loop 600 feet
Pond trail  250 feet
Portion of Upper Meadow trail 400 feet
Coyote Run trail 400 feet
Treehouse trail 150 feet
Paddock trails (TBD) 840 feet

On the rural land foundation property, 5400 feet
Green Lane trail  1050 feet
Brook path 800 feet
Cattail loop  1800 feet
Lower Meadow trail 450 feet
Zions Lane 450 feet
Portion of Upper Meadow trail 850 feet

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

What’s Next for Electronic Health Records?

With the Department of Justice announcement of the $155 million dollar eClinicalWorks settlement (including personal liability for the CEO, CMO and COO), many stakeholders are wondering what’s next for EHRs.

Clearly the industry is in a state of transition.   eCW will be distracted by its 5 year corporate integrity agreement.    AthenaHealth will have to focus on the activist investors at Elliott Management   who now own 10% of the company and have a track record of changing management/preparing companies for sale.    As mergers and acquisitions result in more enterprise solutions, Epic (and to some extent Cerner) will displace other vendors in large healthcare systems.   However, the ongoing operational cost of these enterprise solutions will cause many to re-examine alternatives such as Meditech.

As an engineer, I select products and services based on requirements and not based on marketing materials, procurements by other local institutions, or the sentiment that “no one gets fired by buying vendor X”.

I have a sense that EHR requirements are changing and we’re in transition from EHR 1.0 to EHR 2.0.   Here’s what I’m experiencing:

1.  (Fewer government mandates) The era of prescriptive government regulation requiring specific EHR functionality is ending.   In my conversations with government (executive branch, legislative branch), providers/payers, and academia, I’ve heard over and over that it is better to focus on results achieved than to do something like count the number the CCDA documents sent via the Direct protocol.    If you want to use mobile devices to monitor patients in their homes - great!  If you want to use telemedicine to do wellness checks - great!  If you want to send off duty EMS workers using iPads to evaluate the activities of daily living for elderly patients  - great!  Reducing hospital readmissions is the goal and there are many enabling technologies.    Suggesting that one size fits all in every geography for every patient no longer works as we move from a data recording focus (EHR 1.0) to an outcomes focus (EHR 2.0)

2.  (Team-based care) Clinicians can no longer get through their day when the requirements are to see a patient every 15 minutes, enter 140 structured data elements, submit 40 quality measures, satisfy the patient, and never commit malpractice.  A team of people is needed to maintain health and a new generation of communication tools is needed to support clinical groupware.   This isn’t just HIPAA compliant messaging.   We need workflow integration, rules based escalation of messages, and routing based on time of day/location/schedules/urgency/licensure.  We need automated clinical documentation tools that record what each team member does and then requires a review/signoff by an accountable professional, not writing War and Peace from scratch until midnight (as is the current practice for many primary care clinicians)

3.  (Value-based purchasing) Fee for service is dying and is being replaced by alternative quality contracts based on risk sharing.

Dr. Allan H. Goroll’s excellent New England Journal of Medicine article notes that EHR 1.0 has achieved exactly the result that historical regulation has required - a tool that supports billing and government reporting - not clinician and patient satisfaction.

Our electronic tools for EHR 2.0  should include the functionality necessary to document care plans, variation from those plans, and outcomes reported from patient generated healthcare data.    Components of such software would include the elements that compromise the “Care Management Medical Record” - enrolling patients in protocols based on signs/symptoms/diagnosis, then using customer relationship management concepts to ensure patients receive the services recommended.

ICD-10, CPT, and HCPCS would no longer be necessary.    Bills will no longer be generated.   Payments would be fixed per patient per year and all care team members would be judged on wellness achieved for total medical expense incurred.   SNOMED-CT would be the vocabulary used to record clinical observations for quality measurement.

4. (Usability)  I do not fault EHR developers for the lack of usability in medical software.  They were given thousands of pages of regulations then told to author new software, certify it, and deploy it in 18 months.   I call this the “ask 9 women to have a baby in 1 month” concept, since Meaningful Use timeframes violated the “gestation period” for innovation.   How can we achieve better usability in the future?   My view is that EHRs are platforms (think iPhone) and legions of entrepreneurs creating add on functionality author the apps that run on that platform.  Every week, I work with young people creating the next generation of highly usable clinical functionality that improves usability.     They need to be empowered to get/put data from EHR platforms and emerging FHIR standards will help with that.  

I was recently asked to define HIT innovation.  I said it was the novel application of people, processes and technologies to improve quality, safety and efficiency.    Creating modules that layer on top of existing EHR transactional systems embraces this definition.

5.  (Consumer driven)  In a recent keynote, I joked that my medical school training (30 years ago) in customer service mirrored that provided by the US domestic airlines.   Healthcare experiences can be like boarding a crowded aircraft where your presence is considered an inconvenience to the staff.    We’re entering a new era with evolving  models that are moving care to the home including internet of things monitoring, supporting convenient ambulatory locations near you,  offering urgent care clinics with long hours, enabling electronic self scheduling, and encouraging virtual visits.    Although existing EHR 1.0 products have patient portals, they have not made the patient/family an equal member of the care team, providing them with care navigation tools.  BIDMC is working on an Amazon Echo/Alexa service backed by microservices/Bots that brings ambient listening technologies to the home for coordination with care teams.  When see you articles like this one, you know that the technology tools we have to support patients as consumers are not yet sufficient.


The US has been working on EHR 1.0 for a long time.   57 years ago, the New England Deaconess computerized its pharmacy using an IBM Mainframe.  Here’s the original document from 1960 describing the achievement.   Of note, the document highlights that the overall hospital budget reached a new high - $5.4 million and the increased salary, clinical care and IT expense meant that hospital rates would have to be raised to $25/bed/day.     After nearly six decades of work on EHR 1.0, let’s declare victory and move onto social networking-like groupware supporting teams of caregivers focused on value while treating patients as customers using mobile and ambient listening tools.  Government and private payers need to align incentives to support this future based on outcomes, putting the era of prescriptive EHR 1.0 functionality (and the energy enforcing the regulations) behind us.

Thursday, May 25, 2017

Building Unity Farm Sanctuary - 4th week of May 2017

Spring’s warmth and rain is accelerating our plant and mushroom growth such that every day is a balance between  agricultural management and sanctuary development activities like trail building as pictured below.   The stone bridge you see was built in the early 1800's.


The adventuresome project of last weekend was replacing the 20 year old heating oil tanks in the Sanctuary.   The seams were weeping and oil was accumulating on the sides of the tanks.   I recently heard a nightmarish story about an oil delivery of 500 gallons into a 250 gallon tank that had a newly ruptured seam.   With new tanks, we’ve avoided that risk.   The challenge is that the sanctuary has no basement - just a 4 foot crawl space.   To extract the old oil tanks we had to remove the staircase in the crawl space and lift the tanks to the first floor without spilling old oil or scratching the wood floors.    Not fun, but we were successful.

The other not fun project was replacing all the fiberglass insulation in the crawl space.   In the past, the roof gutters directed water immediately down the side of the building and into the basement causing annual flooding and mold.    We’ve redone the gutters to direct all water away from the foundation.  The crawl space has stayed completely dry this spring.   I pulled 200 linear feet of fiberglass insulation out from the crawlspace, bagging it to avoid dragging mold, mouse droppings and fiberglass through the building.    Lying on my back in the dirt of the crawlspace, I reapplied rolls of R19 insulation and a vapor barrier.   I wore goggles, a mask and full body loose fitting clothing, minimizing fiberglass misery.

While doing the fiberglass project I found a few more hundred feet of old wiring and rusted electrical boxes.   At this point, the only wires in the entire crawlspace are active electrical lines, fire detection sensors, and internet fiber.   Victory!

The next great archeological challenge will be replacing the entire water system and all the plumbing in the crawlspace.   At the moment the plumbing is like the city of troy - built in layers.   What needs to be done?  I’ll take a sawzall at the input pipe from the well and at the main distribution for the building, removing everything in between - a maze of copper and valves installed 1959-1995.    Much of our work on the sanctuary is not about adding infrastructure, it’s about removing 50+ years of infrastructure layers.    The only water system that is needed is a simple pressure tank with a small debris filter directly connected to the house and paddocks.    No water treatment, softeners, or iron removal are needed, massively reducing complexity.   There’s no need for segregated filtered and unfiltered plumbing.  The water test shows that the well is perfect - 10 gallons per minute of sterile, iron free water, so we’ll go from a deep underground stream to house and animals without anything in between.



As unexciting as it sounds, we’ll also be replacing the toilets which date from 1960 to 1990.     In the early 1990s toilets went from high flow to low flow and the models from that era are incredibly unreliable.   Given that the sanctuary is a public space, having a plunger in every room is not the right solution.   Toto toilets will be in place by June.

In the mid 1990s a carriage house/workshop for storage and vehicles was built on the sanctuary property but it was never finished.    There were live electrical wires hanging from the ceiling, walls were primed but never painted, and the fire/smoke alarms were disconnected.     I’ve redone all the electrical/lighting, connected fully wired fire/smoke alarms to the main house by running cable through an underground conduit, and begun the process of wall/ceiling finish work.    The carriage house will become our honey processing area and serve as one of our teaching areas for beekeeping, beer making, and mushroom cultivation.    By July it should be finished to perfection.

This week, the stone dust necessary to finish the paddocks arrives.  How much do we need?  The paddocks are a trapezoid 300 feet on one side, 225 on the other side and 200 feet wide.  If you remember your geometry, the area is (300+225)/2*200=52500 square feet.  Just how much stone dust will cover 52,500 square feet at 3 inches thick (recommended for horses) - just go to this website and you’ll discover we need 700 tons i.e. 1.5 million pounds.    The first 200 tons arrived yesterday.

Once the stone dust is placed, the fencing goes in and by mid June we’ll have four quarter acre paddocks for new rescues.  As soon as its done, I’ll post pictures.

By the time the Summer gives way to Fall, the building of the sanctuary should be complete and my blog posts can return to the joys of running a farm and sanctuary, since maintaining is much easier than creating.

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Building Unity Farm Sanctuary - Third Week of May 2017

In case it seems that my posting frequency has dropped, it’s a combination of a hectic spring farming/sanctuary schedule and writing requests from outside organizations.   For my views on the recent cybersecurity/ransomware events see the PBS Newshour blog.

Unity Farm Sanctuary work clothes have arrived in our closets.   This was my wife’s idea to identify mentors and experienced volunteers on the property.   We have so many visitors every day who are walking the trails, visiting the animals, and offering to help that we need to separate those with experience from those who are new to the sanctuary.    The shirts make it easy to find someone knowledgeable.


Our 501(c)(3) charitable designation should be approved soon, but in the meantime, we're receiving donations of equipment and items considered useful for the sanctuary.   For example, this 1800’s wheelbarrow seemed just the right tool for an 1833 meeting house.  It was dropped off earlier this week.    Some has just donated a canoe for sanctuary visitors who want to explore the upper marshes of the Charles River which has a canoe put in a few minutes drive from the sanctuary.



Later this week, another Welsh Pony,  named Grace will arrive at the Sanctuary.   We’re building new paddocks as fast as we can but they will not be ready until the end of June/early July.     Grace will live with the goats in the short term.   The goat paddock has two run ins so the pony can have a private space.

The process of creating 2 acres of new paddocks that are safe for horses takes diligence.   First, we cleared brush and leveled out the land.  Then we applied a layer of “tailings” rocks and dirt that provide a layer of drainage.   Then “stone dust” provides the finished surface which is solid and smooth but still promotes drainage.   Once that is done, we’re adding some additional fencing and gates so that we can easily bring in food and remove manure.    Then we add south-facing run in buildings to protect the animals from inclement weather.   Finally, we trench for electrical and water supplies to each building.   I’ll be doing all the electrical and plumbing, so we keep expenses to a minimum.   When completed, the 4 new paddocks, each about a half acre, will enable us to take on a few more creatures that need rescuing such as a donkey and a few sheep that we were recently told need a new home.   We’re very careful to take on new animal responsibilities selectively so that we can provide each the daily attention it needs.  As I’ve said before, we provide “forever homes” and thus we need to budget our time and resources for the long term support of any animal that arrives.

Next week, a “rafter” of turkeys arrives at the sanctuary, which will provide an instant family for Palmer, our Royal Palm tom turkey.   Palmer is extremely social and follows humans on long walks into the woods.   It will be fascinating to see how he adapts to young poults.    Thus far, the 20 wild turkeys at the sanctuary do not interact much with Palmer, although they call to each other in the night.

The work on the sanctuary buildings continue and last weekend I removed all the obsolete electrical circuitry from the 1960’s.   The 1833 Sanctuary building was moved to its current site in 1959 and the area underneath is only 3 feet high because of all the unmovable ledge rocks at the site that prevented digging a full basement.   I found numerous open electrical boxes with exposed wiring in the crawlspace that looked a bit dangerous for anyone doing work on heaters, plumbing or other under building infrastructure.   I carefully traced every wire and found that they were unconnected at both ends - just hundreds of feet of old cable and numerous electrical boxes with no purpose whatsoever.    I removed everything.   The good news is that neither the building’s electrical system nor my body was harmed in the process, although I did emerge from the crawlspace covered with mud, cobwebs, and decades of accumulated dust.    I also removed old thermostat wires, door bell wires, and phone lines that have not been used in decades.    I’m fairly confident that the work I’ve done thus far under the building - removing about half a mile of old wiring - is now done.   Maybe I’ll never have to spend another weekend day crawling under the building.    Luckily Claustrophobia and Arachnophobia are not issues for me.


This weekend will include the usual extra time with the animals, providing them companionship and extra exercise plus the tasks of spring - mushroom inoculation, planting warm weather seedlings (cucumbers/peppers/tomatoes).   All of the apple trees are in bloom, all of the hoop house vegetables are thriving, and the mushroom logs are fruiting.   2017 should be a bumper crop.